Sacramento Tree Foundation


Our mission is to build healthy, more livable communities throughout the Sacramento Region by working towards growing the best urban forest in the nation.

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Address:191 Lathrop Way Suite D
Sacramento, CA 95815
County or Parish:Sacramento
Primary NTEE:Environment 
Sub NTEE:Forest Conservation 
Executive Director:Ray Tretheway
Contact Email:engage@sactree.com
Primary Phone:916-924-8733
Website:http://www.sactree.com
Founded in 1982, the Sacramento Tree Foundation is the leading regional source for high-quality education and outreach programs that empower the public to understand the importance of trees and then act to improve their own communities. While our programs focus on the urban forest, much of their power comes from engaging citizens to learn about the environment in which they live and to become active in their schools, neighborhoods, and communities. We offer our programs to neighborhoods and people of all ages and backgrounds, with a special emphasis on underserved populations.

Over the past thirty-five years, we have inspired the planting of 1.5 million trees in Sacramento. In doing so, we have positively impacted the health and quality of life of all of Sacramento's citizens. Our most popular program, Sacramento Shade, provides free energy-saving shade trees to Sacramento county residents. Incredibly, it has delivered over 600,000 trees to homeowners since 1990.

In 2004, we began strategically influencing elected officials to adopt a regional framework, called the Greenprint Initiative, to collectively build the best regional urban forest possible. In support of our vision we have launched a regional framework, called Greenprint, to plant and steward five million new trees: four million in new neighborhoods to meet the needs of the expected population growth of one million new people by 2035 and one million trees in existing neighborhoods, principally under-resourced neighborhoods. We envision a region where trees are valued for the many benefits they provide.

Our six county region had few trees prior to 1850. Our historic landscape was one of marshes and grasslands, with just a narrow ribbon of trees along our rivers and waterways. Today our region has over 7 million trees, however the average canopy cover is a mere 17%. For every existing tree in the region there are two spaces without trees. We are dedicated to reaching the widest audience possible in order to share the many linkages between an abundant, healthy, urban forest and the quality of life in our region and our planet. Growing scientific evidence highlights the public health benefits of neighborhood trees and green spaces. Trees have a powerful impact on air quality, climate change, energy conservation, water quality, economy, comfort, habitat and public health. Only by achieving maximum tree canopy cover throughout the region can we capture and optimize the remarkable benefits of trees. By educating and engaging citizens from all walks of life and from all neighborhoods, we can enhance the health and livability of our community with the benefits of a thriving urban forest.
We've been working to bring our innovative NeighborWoods Program to undeserved neighborhoods, such as South Sacramento. Between now and 2019, our goal is to plant approximately 3,000 new trees on public and private land within the 95823, 95824, 95828 zip codes optimizing the many benefits of a large, diverse, and healthy tree canopy. To do this effectively we will have to become part of the community, increasing our outreach through discussions with engaged citizens, neighborhood associations, and partnerships with community based organizations. This outreach will create opportunities for planting projects and tree education for community members.

We are actively creating a more robust and formalized volunteer program. We would like to have a pathways program in place, giving individuals the option of becoming more involved with our organization if they choose to do so. Example: episodic volunteers become VIP volunteers, assisting staff with day of event set up duties, VIP volunteers become Planting Leaders, assisting staff with planting demonstrations and quality assurance, etc. We are also working to recruit volunteers with more specialized skills (e.g. translation abilities, videographer/photography experience, etc.). Over the next year, we plan on having a successful volunteer recruitment, retention, and recognition program in place, making sure that our volunteers have a consistent and extremely positive experience while working with the Tree Foundation.

Hand-in-hand with our volunteer program, we are formalizing our internship procedures. We often welcome interns, however, we would like to do more, creating partnerships with local universities and community colleges, helping to educate the next generation of Urban Foresters.

Our top needs:
  1. Funding: Program - We've been working to bring our innovative NeighborWoods Program to undeserved neighborhoods, such as South Sacramento. Between now and 2019, our goal is to plant approximately 3,000 new trees on public and private land within the 95823, 95824, 95828 zip codes optimizing the many benefits of a large, diverse, and healthy tree canopy. To do this effectively we will have to become part of the community, increasing our outreach through discussions with engaged citizens, neighborhood associations, and partnerships with community based organizations. This outreach will create opportunities for planting projects and tree education for community members.
  2. In-Kind Donations - We are always in need of tools. Gloves, hard hats, shovels, wheelbarrows, etc.
  3. Volunteers - We always need volunteers to help us with planting! Have a special skill? Let us know!
'In 1981, a group of visionaries came together to form an organization dedicated to planting and protecting Sacramento's trees. The urgency to establish a regional "voice for the trees" was very real: the city and county's ability to care for public trees was being curtailed by shrinking budgets, threatening one of the area's greatest assets. Meanwhile, patterns of suburban growth at the time, marked by treeless roadways and the destruction of native trees and habitats, reflected an unfortunate disregard for the value of trees in our lives. The mission of the Sacramento Tree Foundation, to plant trees in order to achieve healthy, livable communities, is just as relevant today as it was back then, but our impact on the community has grown.'

'In the three decades since the Sacramento Tree Foundation was founded, we have facilitated the planting of more than 1.5 million trees, and mobilized tens of thousands of individuals across the Sacramento region to make their corner of the world more beautiful. Yet from the beginning our mission has been about more than transforming the landscape. We have proved time and again that trees change lives. Consider the families whose modest yards line a busy roadway clogged with commuter traffic throughout the day. The mature trees along their fence lines provide a leafy barrier to the exhaust fumes of passing automobiles, allowing children at play to breathe freely. Or how about the aging couple who maintain their daily fitness routine, a brisk walk around the neighborhood park, even in the scorching summer heat, thanks to the vast canopy of red maples and sycamores that shade their path. And think of the generations of school children in a local district who can now play and learn beneath the shade of 1,000 trees planted on their campuses by legions of caring volunteers. These stories, and countless others just like them, demonstrate clearly that trees alter our lives for the better. That is why the Sacramento Tree Foundation has set a goal to plant five million more trees in the Sacramento region.'

'We are uniquely qualified to reach this goal. We are one of the largest, most successful urban tree-planting organizations in the world. We are recognized nationally for delivering innovative programs based on science and best practices. We have strong relationships with community leaders and thousands of volunteers, and the technical know-how to get the job done. But we cannot do it alone. This historic endeavor requires a major investment of resources from those who share our vision of a greener, leafier, healthier Sacramento region.'

Sincerely,
Ray Tretheway, Executive Director