CCHAT Center
DONATE NOW
916-361-7290 ext. 2
Share page
Organization Details

Programs

Description
There is a definite need within surrounding school districts for training of teachers, speech therapists, and additional school personnel on classroom best practices for students with hearing loss and the use of hearing assistance technology (hearing aids, cochlear implants, and FM systems). The Mainstream Support Program provides the tools necessary to ensure that the hard-earned gains these students have made with spoken language are not eroding and that they will have uninterrupted access to their mainstream education. Most public and private schools in the Sacramento area have had little direct experience with students who are deaf or hard of hearing. When a school is unfamiliar with hearing loss, hearing aids, cochlear implants, and other assistive devices commonly used by these students, it can be difficult to anticipate the students' unique needs, both academically and socially.

CCHAT's deaf and hard of hearing mainstream support service puts an experienced teacher of the deaf and hard of hearing (DHOH) and an educational audiologist at neighborhood schools to offer assistance to both the student and the school staff. CCHAT is now providing direct and consultative deaf and hard of hearing and educational audiology services to over 300 students in eight school districts and five counties.

A trained and experienced DHOH teacher is able to provide support and training to school professionals, parents, and students through a variety of personalized services which incorporate specific strategies to enhance each student's communication and success. In addition, CCHAT's educational audiologists are uniquely qualified to support students in the mainstream to assure they have auditory access to the information in all learning environments. They work directly with students, parents, teachers, support personnel and administrators as part of the educational team. The educational audiologists can also address the acoustical challenges that impact staff and students and offer recommendations for minimizing these challenges.
Budget
$106,000
Program Successes
For many students who are deaf or hard or hearing, the support provided by this program is critical to success. The DHOH teacher and audiologist's expertise on hearing loss and its effect on the learning process ensures that any challenges the student is facing are noticed and addressed immediately. Having a DHOH teacher and educational audiologist involved in a student's academic program helps put the student, the classroom teacher and the other children at ease so they can all focus on what's important - learning and growing together.
Description
This program focuses primarily on increasing language and literacy outcomes for CCHAT's Spanish speaking students by providing a bilingual Speech-Language Pathology Assistant (SLPA). Research shows that language acquisition is much more difficult for children with hearing loss when they are not given speech therapy in their primary language (Werfel, et al, 2014). 20% of CCHAT's students need to receive speech services in Spanish in order to maximize their therapeutic outcomes. CCHAT is committed to addressing the language needs of bilingual students because, remarkably, when they are taught oral speech in their home language they acquire speech at far higher rates than their deaf and hard of hearing (D/HH) peers who receive services in only English (Werfel, et al, 2014). Furthermore, they outperform their hearing peers in literacy! By embedding Spanish into all facets of our program, we maximize auditory and spoken language outcomes for the Spanish speaking children enrolled at CCHAT.

CCHAT's Spanish speaking SLPA provides speech therapy for our bilingual children in their primary language twice a week as a compliment to the two days a week of individualized speech therapy that they receive in English. Daily speech therapy, coupled with intensive classroom instruction, is critical for the language and literacy development of children who are deaf or hard of hearing.
Budget
$50,000
Program Successes
- CCHAT's February 2019 professional conference addressed two current topics: Managing children who are DHH who use spoken language in the mainstream and addressing the needs of children who are DHH speaking more than one language. 50% of CCHAT students speak a language other than English in the home.
- CCHAT hosted the professional conference, 'Children Who are D/HH Learning More Than One Spoken Language' on April 9, 2016. It was attended by all CCHAT staff and professionals in the community who support bilingual children with hearing loss in mainstream educational settings.
- CCHAT secured funding to expand our bilingual library. We now have three Spanish/English copies of each of the books used within the Happily Ever After Storybook Curriculum. Two copies are available to support speech therapy goals/objectives and one copy travels home to help families support language and literacy growth at home in their primary language.
- Parent Component: CCHAT's bilingual SLPA participates in the Center's weekly Baby & Me Class to facilitate engagement by those families new to their child's hearing loss diagnosis and the listening and spoken language communication option. She continues to play an integral role in communicating with CCHAT's Spanish speaking families to ensure that they understand the important role they play in the listen, speech and language growth of their child.
- Standardized language assessments which include receptive and expressive testing in both English and Spanish will help determine dominant language and the comparison of scores from previous year to measure increased growth with bilingual services in place.
Description
Baby and Me Program: Infants 0-18 months attend a parent participation class for 1 1/2 hours per week and receive two hours of individual speech therapy per week. This program offers training, guidance, and support to parents of the very youngest children with hearing loss while teaching them the foundation for their child's speech and language development. Participation in the playgroup setting can start immediately after early diagnosis.

Toddler Program: Children 18-36 months attend class two to five times per week for 2 1/2 hours per day and receive a minimum of 30 minutes of individual speech therapy each day of attendance. School-wide thematic instruction provides each child the opportunity to advance speech and language skills according to individual developmental needs. Every child gains from a planned teaching strategy that promotes his or her own ability to think; acquire speech and language from the manipulation of ideas; and to listen with increasing skill and sophistication.
Budget
$644,050
Program Successes
Hearing loss in infants is a "neurodevelopmental emergency" due to the limited time the brain has to make auditory neural connections. If meaningful sound is not given to children within their first three years, the auditory neural connections within their brains are "pruned," making oral language development difficult (Anderson, 2011). CCHAT's Infant/Toddler Early Intervention Programs capitalizes on the natural window for language acquisition by providing the specialized intervention services necessary for children with hearing loss to acquire speech and language. A child who is diagnosed with hearing loss needs a family that is committed to helping them learn to listen and talk. For this reason, the Infant/Toddler Early Intervention Programs strives to empower each family with the information they need to understand their child's hearing loss, take an active role in their children's listening/language growth and education and become informed advocates for their child's future needs.
Description
CCHAT offers Preschool Programs for children from two to five years of age. The staff creates a supportive learning environment that follows the child's developmental age and individual learning styles. The standard auditory/oral program is enhanced by use of pre-reading and pre-math skills comparable to that taught in public school. Classes utilize the Happily Ever After pre-literacy curriculum.

This curriculum is designed to promote language development and pre-literacy skills for special needs children ages two to six years. The format is straightforward. Twelve favorite children's books are presented as a basis for a year-long language intervention program. Each student who attends the Preschool Program receives daily speech, language and listening therapy. Other aspects of the CCHAT Center's programs are offered in our daily music program that utilizes Rhythmic Phonetics and other innovative methods to enhance the development of speech and language skills.
Budget
$292,750
Program Successes
The Preschool Program includes 'reverse mainstream students' who are typically developing hearing models for their classmates who are deaf or hard of hearing. This model is unique and is considered a leading-edge approach to teaching children with hearing loss to listen and speak. The conversation between deaf and hearing children enriches both. While modeling typical speech for their friends with hearing loss, hearing children who attend CCHAT learn that we are all inherently worthy of kindness and attention, competent when faced with challenges, and capable of friendship. Early detection of hearing loss and specialized intervention services like those provided in CCHAT's Preschool Program have many children with hearing loss mainstreaming back into their neighborhood school settings by kindergarten. Children (with hearing loss) who developed spoken language through listening developed reading ability comparable to their peers who hear normally (Robertson, L., & Flexer, C. (1993)).
Description
CCHAT is certified by the State of California to provide school based services for children through 3rd grade. All classes have a low student to teacher ratio. Class size ranges from two to ten students, depending upon the lesson or activity. This ensures that individualized attention is devoted to the promotion of speech, language, listening, and thinking skills. The Center currently has kindergarten, first, second, and third grade classrooms.

In the Primary Programs, instruction is guided by CCHAT's thematic unit outline and by California Common Core standards. Students in the primary grades participate in a physical education program that meets state standards. Each student who attends the Primary Program receives daily speech, language, and listening therapy. CCHAT now employs a Spanish speaking Speech Language Pathology Assistant who provided individualized speech therapy in Spanish for our second language children with hearing loss. Other aspects of the CCHAT Center's programs are offered in our daily music program that utilizes Rhythmic Phonetics and other innovative methods to enhance the development of speech and language skills.
Budget
$614,775
Program Successes
Students enter the mainstream having had access to the same Common Core Curriculum as their hearing peers. With age appropriate speech and language skills, alumni students have a seamless transition into a typical educational setting and perform at levels comparable to their hearing peers. Specialized intervention services like those offered at CCHAT are a good investment. Research shows that by the time a child with hearing loss graduates from high school, more than $400,000 per child can be saved by tax payers in special education costs if the child is identified early and given appropriate educational, medical and audiological services (White, K.R. & Maxon, A.B. 1995). CCHAT students have the ability to thrive in their neighborhood schools and communities. With listening and spoken language skills, children with hearing loss who have attended CCHAT can fully participate in activities, educational opportunities, and competitive sports like their hearing peers.
Description
This program is a comprehensive and coordinated system of early identification, tracking, and monitoring of hearing screening, access to diagnostic services and coordination of appropriate intervention and support services for newborns and infants with hearing loss. The goal is to identify children with a hearing loss prior to three months of age and to implement audiological and early intervention services by six months of age. Newborns and infants who do not pass the inpatient infant hearing screening are referred to an outpatient infant hearing screening provider for hearing re-screening that should be performed within one month of discharge. As a follow up screening site, CCHAT will help to ensure that re-screening is timely and families are aware of the benefit of early and appropriate amplification and enrollment in an early intervention program. It is our hope that as an additional re-screening/diagnostic site, there will be a decrease in the number of infants who are lost to follow-up.
Budget
$150,000
Program Successes
CCHAT expanded its services to include diagnostic testing in July 2014. CCHAT now partners with local hospitals and the Northern California Hearing Coordination Centers to ensure timely follow-up care for infants who did not pass the inpatient newborn hearing screening. Availability to this type of service is especially significant for those families who struggle with access to healthcare (i.e. low income families.). Of primary concern to CCHAT is the fact that hearing loss is more prevalent than all other disorders combined that are also screened during the newborn period. Access to timely follow-up hearing health services and information that includes early intervention resources will help mitigate the negative impacts of hearing loss on speech/language acquisition, academic achievement and social/emotional development. This past year, this program provided re-screening and diagnostic evaluation services to 66 newborns.